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This is how many eggs you should freeze based on your age

Here’s what the most up-to-date studies say about the ideal number of eggs to freeze to best ensure you can have children in the future.
How many eggs to freeze based on your age
How many eggs to freeze based on your age
Egg freezing is getting very popular, as awareness about fertility is becoming more commonly talked about, more employers are offering insurance coverage for egg freezing, and women are having children later in life.

With the rise in egg freezing, more women are asking the question, "when should I freeze my eggs?" and “how many eggs should I freeze?”. 

If you’re going to be shelling out money and time to preserve your fertility, you obviously want to make sure that once your eggs are on ice, you have enough of them to have children in the future. 

A recent large study of women who froze their eggs looked at how many eggs they froze in a cycle to see how many women were able to freeze the optimal number of eggs estimated to ensure the highest chance of having a baby in the future.

One important thing to note here ladies, egg freezing is not a guarantee.

But freezing as many good quality eggs as you can will give you the best chances of having a baby if you do need to use your frozen eggs to get pregnant.

Egg quality declines with age so freezing your eggs now certainly gives you a better chance of conceiving as opposed to using your eggs when you’re older.

How many eggs should I freeze?


It depends! The most recent research has suggested that the older you are, the more eggs you need to freeze to get the same result as a younger woman.

A large study from 2020 was done at Extend Fertility in New York, which looked at the likelihood that women will achieve a 70% live birth rate after doing just one or two rounds of egg freezing. 

The study didn’t look at how many eggs were needed for an 80% chance or a 90% chance. A 70% chance of a live baby being born from frozen eggs was the optimal threshold to meet.

Number of eggs you need to freeze based on your age to attain an optimal live birth rate

Age 50% Live Birth Rate 60% Live Birth Rate 70% Live Birth Rate
<35 6 8 9
35-37 7 8 10
38-40 11 13 16
41-42 20 24 28
>42 50 70 80
Maslow et al., 2020 used age-based egg thresholds from two studies to assess how many eggs a woman should freeze for a 50%, 60%, and 70% live birth rate. Most data was from Doyle et al however, the >42 age group threshold was from *Goldman et al.

The above table shows the numbers to hit in order to feel comfortable with the amount of eggs you have frozen.

For example, a woman who is 37 years old should freeze 10 eggs in order to attain a 70% chance of a live birth.

Women who are 38 years old should freeze 16 eggs to reach the same chance of having a baby. 

If you don’t get the number of eggs you expected in your first egg freezing cycle, you may want to discuss with your doctor whether a second round of egg freezing makes sense for your goals.

But how many women are actually able to freeze their ideal number of eggs in their first egg freezing cycle?

Read on to see the results from over 1,200 women!

How many women freeze enough eggs from their first egg freezing cycle?


Ok, so you know how many eggs you want to freeze but how many you are actually able to freeze in a cycle depends. 

Some women meet their goal in just one round of egg freezing while other women may need to do a second egg freezing cycle. 

In the study from Extend Fertility, looked at over 1200 women who froze their eggs to get an average of how many eggs women actually freeze based on their age.

Half of all women in the study froze their optimal number of eggs in their first cycle. The outcome was highly dependent on age at the time of the egg retrieval. 

Two thirds of women in their 20s and early 30s were able to freeze their ideal number of eggs with just one round of egg freezing. The success rate lowered as age increased.

Women who achieved the 70% live birth rate threshold after their first round of egg freezing

Younger women were able to freeze enough eggs in their first egg freezing cycle to meet the threshold needed for an estimated 70% chance of live birth. As age increased, less women were able to freeze enough eggs in their first cycle to meet this goal.
Younger women were able to freeze enough eggs in their first egg freezing cycle to meet the threshold needed for an estimated 70% chance of live birth. As age increased, less women were able to freeze enough eggs in their first cycle to meet this goal.

Women in their mid-thirties met the optimal egg freezing threshold about half the time from their first round of egg freezing and just 18% of women in their late thirties were able to freeze the optimal number of eggs in their first cycle.

The big drop off in egg freezing success was seen for women in their forties.

At this point, you should discuss with your doctor whether it makes sense to freeze your eggs given your age and whether you should consider alternative options to increase your chance of having a child.

Average number of eggs women actually freeze in their first cycle


Don’t let the numbers scare you too much when it comes to your goals. 

While there is an optimal number of eggs that fertility doctors recommend to freeze in order to have a child in the future, some women end up actually freezing more eggs than their goal, which is great!

For example, women who are 35 to 37 years old should freeze 10 eggs in order to meet the threshold of a 70% live birth rate, but women in this group actually froze 15 eggs on average. 

Age Goal number of eggs Average actual number of eggs frozen
<35 9 15
35-37 10 12
38-40 16 10
41-42 28 7
>42 80 6
The goal number of eggs was the amount needed to freeze to attain an estimated 70% chance of a live birth.

Women in their late 30s and 40s didn't freeze enough eggs on average in their first cycle to meet the optimal number needed.

So it’s pretty clear that egg freezing has better outcomes in your 20s and early 30s compared to women in their late 30s and 40s.

What affects your success with egg freezing?


All women were able to freeze enough eggs to meet the optimum threshold after two rounds of egg freezing but not all women were able to do so in their first cycle.

Women that froze enough eggs in their first cycle to meet a 70% chance of a future live birth were younger on average and had a higher AMH, which is a hormone level used to estimate ovarian reserve.

Between the group that did freeze enough eggs in their first round and women who did not, the average age was 34 vs 37 years old and the difference in AMH level was 4.01 vs 1.81, respectively.

Find a fertility doctor to discuss egg freezing


So who do you go to if you’re interested in egg freezing? 

You speak with a fertility specialist known as a reproductive endocrinologist.

These doctors are OBGYNs that further specialize in reproductive medicine. They work with women who are interested in preserving their fertility as well as women who are actively trying to conceive. 

Where do I find a fertility specialist?

You can look at all of the fertility doctors in your area using the Fertility Space provider search. Look up a clinic for egg freezing in your area.

Just type in your location into the search to see a list of all fertility clinics in your area.

You can filter by egg freezing although 99% of fertility clinics offer egg freezing, so you don’t necessarily need to filter. Under services on the clinic’s profile, you’ll see ‘Egg Freezing’ checked off as a service. 

You can view their IVF success rates, read patient reviews, check out the doctors, and see how close they are to you. When you’re ready to reach out to them for more info, go ahead and contact them by calling or emailing the clinic directly. 

Good luck on your egg freezing cycle! 💕